24 - 10 - 2017

Early Language

Early Expressive Language Development

Listed below is some information regarding expressive language expectations at children’s different stages of development. Expressive language refers to a child’s vocabulary, grammatical and sentence structure. Please use this information as a guide, not a diagnosis. If there is any concern that your child’s expressive language is not developing appropriately for their age then it is recommended that they receive a language assessment by a Speech Pathologist.

12 months:

  • Child speaks 1st words (usually mama, dada etc).
  • Intonation present in child’s babble (child appears to have their own language and will often talk in this language to toys and people).
  • Child begins to imitate some words.

12 – 18 months:

  • Child starts to use more true words (expected to use between 3 – 20 words).
  • Child uses words and gesture to get what they want.

18 – 24 months:

  • Child uses approximately 50 recognisable words.
  • Child produces animal noises.
  • Child says own name.
  • Child begins to use different word types e.g. verbs (go, stop, run) and adjectives (big/little, happy/sad etc).
  • Child begins to combine two words together e.g. “mummy car”, “big bus” etc.

24 – 30 months:
(2 – 2 ½ years)

  • There is an increase in utterance length.
  • Child uses approximately 200 recognisable words.
  • Grammatical structures start to emerge, such as:
    • Articles ‘a’ and ‘the’
    • ing endings
    • Prepositions ‘in’ and ‘on’
    • Plurals ‘cats’, ‘boats’, ‘cars’ etc

2 ½ – 3 years:

  • There is further increase in utterance length.
  • Child uses approximately 500 intelligible words.
  • Complex grammatical structures are used, such as:
    • Regular past tense (walked)
    • Pronouns (I, me, you, mine)
    • Negative ‘not’

If you have concerns regarding your child’s expressive language development it is recommended that you receive an assessment by a Speech Pathologist. Your Speech Pathologist will assess your child’s language and recommend the best options for intervention. Intervention often involves teaching parents language stimulation techniques to implement with their child. Some of these techniques are based on “It Takes Two to Talk”, The Hanen Program. Please see the Hanen website for further information www.hanen.org

References:

  • Gard, Gilman and Gorman (1993) Speech and Language Developmental Chart Texas: Pro-ed
  • Owens (1996) Language Development – an Introduction 4th Edition New York: Allyn & Bacon

 

 

Early Receptive Language Development

Listed below is some information regarding receptive language expectations at children’s different stages of development. Receptive Language refers to a child’s understanding. Please use this information as a guide, not a diagnosis. If there is any concern that your child’s receptive language is not developing appropriately for their age then it is recommended that they receive a language assessment by a Speech Pathologist.

12 months:

  • Child follows simple one – step commands regarding body action (e.g. clap hands, wave).
  • Reacts to ‘no’ intonation.
  • Looks in correct place for toys out of sight.
  • Turns head immediately when own name is said.
  • Indicates displeasure when toy is removed.

12 – 18 months:

  • Follows simple one – step commands.
  • Points to toys, objects, animals or clothes when named.
  • Points to wanted objects.
  • Points to 1 – 3 named body parts when asked.

18 – 24 months:

  • Comprehends approximately 300 words.
  • Child points to 5 body parts on themselves or on a toy.
  • Child responds to yes/no questions (head shake).

24 – 30 months:
(2 – 2 ½ years)

  • Comprehends approximately 500 words.
  • Can follow a series of two related commands.
  • Understands concepts of ‘one’ and ‘all’.

2 ½ – 3 years:

  • Comprehends approximately 900 words.
  • Understands concepts ‘in’, ‘on’, ‘under’, ‘big’, ‘little’
  • Matches colours.
  • Has sequenced routines for daily living.

If you have concerns regarding your child’s receptive language development it is recommended that you receive an assessment by a Speech Pathologist. Your Speech Pathologist will assess your child’s language and recommend the best options for intervention. Early assessment of children’s receptive language skills is advised as it allows for problem areas to be identified and addressed prior to starting school. Therapy is fun and interactive and homework tasks are always practical and allow for continual progress.

References:

 

  • Gard, Gilman and Gorman (1993) Speech and Language Developmental Chart Texas: Pro-ed
  • Owens (1996) Language Development – an Introduction 4th Edition New York: Allyn & Bacon